14
May
20

Strange Cyphers

20200505_152817This is from a newspaper dating to 1931, figures that were found on the body of a woman floating in the surf off of Southport, Maine that same year .

There are many questions surrounding these cyphers, besides what they might stand for – why might the woman have wrapped the card they were written on carefully in waxed paper to protect them if she was going to commit suicide as the authorities believed?

Why did she, a woman in her 30’s, travel alone from the Philadelphia/New York area to the summer town of Boothbay Harbor, Maine in December of 1931?

What prompted her to rip the labels out of most of her clothing and also to remove labels from her prescription bottles? Did she even check in to the hotel under her real name, signing in as Louise Meade?

She was determined to see “the Rockbound Coast of Maine” according to witnesses. So much so, that she walked about 6 miles, in high heels, in December, without a coat, to get to the wild, open coast!

Found several days later with a belt buckled around her wrists and an early electric iron cord (with iron) and her pocketbook handles tied up, also.

Another mystery involves this finding – many folks saw her walking those 6 miles and she was not carrying a bag large enough to hold a heavy iron and she was not wearing a belt.

Yet, the local police determined that she had committed suicide and the case was closed.  The woman was buried in an unmarked grave in a local cemetery due to the generosity of the townspeople. Can you help us figure out what these numbers and letters might mean? Do you have a missing person in your family genealogy that might be “Louise”?

 

 

21
Apr
20

Maine Woods Walk

Hello! It is early Spring here in Maine and it looks it – we have very little green yet and not much blooming unless in a well tended garden with Southern exposure.

Since we have been under a “Stay at Home” directive for several weeks, I’ve been taking daily walks in my backyard woods and I decided to offer a weekly Facebook Live video to share with you the changes as Spring emerges in the woods and around the pond.

The first one was just last week, but I wanted you to be able to watch it so that you could see the changes when you join us this coming Friday. Here is the 30 minute video, Maine Woods Walk.

Since we are unable to do our regular walking tours now, I thought I’d incorporate our “Tidbit Tasting Tours” into this, as there are many connections to some of the iconic Maine foods that we offer on our Tasting Tours. So every week, we will show or tell you something interesting about Maine foods or products.

These will be every Friday afternoon at 4 p.m. on my Facebook page. We’ll probably do a series of about 6 weeks and then perhaps another series in the Fall. When you join in on Friday, please say “Hi” in the comment section, so I know you’re there and ask questions if you have them along the way!

15
Apr
20

Coach Stop Inn

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COACH STOP INN

This post is about one of the oldest inns on Mt. Desert Island,Maine, and one of the most haunted!

The Coach Stop Inn on the road to Bar Harbor, Maine was built in 1804 and was known as the Halfway Tavern in those early days. It was used to host early newcomers to the island – newcomers who came to build homes, establish farms and build fishing schooners.

Travelers arriving by boat and wanting to go inland to visit or look for a place to settle would also take advantage of all that such a tavern had to offer – rooms, drink and companionship.

The current Bed & Breakfast is known as the oldest establishment in the area, and possibly the oldest house still standing, being the only lodging establishment to survive the Fire of 1947. It is an example of a type of architecture known as Federal style, which blossomed in the newly founded United States of America between 1780 and 1830.

I’m not sure when the Halfway Tavern became a stagecoach stop, but as early as the mid 1600’s the General Court made towns liable to maintain an ordinary – or tavern – though these were usually at harbors due to the fact that most travel in those days was by water. The government felt that it was important to have provisions for travelers. Taverns were set up along the post roads, usually about every 3 miles or so, and usually had accommodations for watering horses as well.

Regular stagecoach service began in Maine after the Revolutionary War. The stagecoach routes followed the old post roads and so it was natural to have the taverns used as stage stops and they were often the first “post offices” in the area. This made them popular gathering places for local people to come and get the news and visit with their neighbors. Folks would know when the stage had come because drivers announced their arrival by blowing on a horn.

There is a cemetery very near the Coach Stop Inn, Leland Cemetery, that holds graves dating to the 1830’s. These older burials are all for the children of Ebenezer and Thankful Leland – Ira and Eben, both in their 20’s. Two other children also died in their prime.

This does not explain the amount of childlike hauntings and strange occurrences that happen in the Inn! One of the child spirits is nicknamed “Abbe” because she often is heard or seen in the room of the Inn that is called Abbe after the founder of the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor. Some of “Abbe’s” antics, described by guests and owners, are fleeting reflections, a child’s voice and flickering lights. If you happen to be staying in the Abbe room, beware – she might lock you out, or in!

“Abbe” seems to like music, as she’s more active when it’s on, but “Abbe” is not the only spirit at play here. Voices of several children might be heard echoing throughout the rooms, as well as strange sounds and manifestations in mirrors at the Inn.

Furniture and other objects are often discovered to have been rearranged and guest’s belongings are sometimes moved or found in disarray. One guest took his clothing into the bathroom while showering and found them neatly laid out on the bed, while another had laid his on the bed to put on after his shower, but found them strewn about the room when he came out!

This is a working inn, so whether you want a spooky stay or just a great Bed & Breakfast – make a reservation!

07
Apr
20

World Health Day

Today is World Health Day, an international day created in 1950 to celebrate the founding of the World Health Organization in 1948.

I am writing today to just offer hope and prayers for all of us in the world because we are all affected one way or another by this pandemic. I’m hoping with the help of WHO and others working so hard to find solutions that we can soon be working together to help our fellow humans through this incredibly difficult time.

Thank you to health care workers of all types and to the scientists and to all the people who are risking their health and working overtime to save lives. Special thanks to the countless “unknown” helpers who are delivering groceries, making masks, teaching our children, helping a neighbor, etc.

Please remember you don’t know what one’s personal situation might be, so just be kind and helpful.

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15
Dec
19

Santa Claus at the Department Store

20191214_200420This is me about 58 years ago. Maybe I was asking for a Chatty Cathy doll, one of my favorite Christmas presents! My mother had taken me from our rural community to “the big city” to see Santa Claus. I do not have much in the way of a memory of this, though the magical image of him in the department store window, and lines of children waiting their turn is familiar.

In our area, a trip to the city was a cause for something special – you dressed in your Sunday best and had a special occasion to visit the department store; maybe a wedding or back to school clothes, some sort of milestone. We also dressed to visit the dentist or doctor and maybe had a chance to go out to lunch!

A Christmas visit to Santa was one such milestone! I don’t remember going more than once, but I’m sure many children did. Just a visit to the city was excitement enough, but at Christmas time – oh my! Downtown department stores often had signature restaurants, cafes or tea rooms that were a delight for the senses. I particularly remember the very elegant restrooms in the department store!

Of course all stores didn’t have Santa Claus, some had train displays or lit villages in a winter wonderland, or displays of bows, bells, packages and holly. Snowmen and animated elves working in Santa’s workshop were common. Nativity scenes were often present as well. Carols were played on loudspeakers everywhere, which added to the festive season!

I did not grow up in New England, but for those of you that did, this may bring back some fond memories – http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/downtown-department-stores-meant-christmas/?fbclid=IwAR3tU-LjzYM1W03W1zDh0JTCZoTa4WQf0PPxST_aWIThebo7XunqsVYDgs0

26
Nov
19

Colonial Life in New England

Today I had the best time doing a presentation on Colonial Life. This is something I’ve been fascinated with/by/about as long as I can remember!

I was able to take a few family heirlooms that I have to use as examples.

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Since it’s almost Thanksgiving, this was a fun topic to explore and think about as the Pilgrims landed 399 years ago!

We talked about cranes in fireplaces, baking ovens using cabbage leaves, spider pots and porringers, among other cooking items.

The Colonial table was very different than you might imagine. First of all, it was called a board, as it was a board just set on trestles or sawhorses. The covering was a boardcloth rather than tablecloth! There were no chairs, just benches or stools and we learned that children rarely sat – they stood at the table or even behind their parents, waiting to be handed food.

Most meat was cooked into “spoon meat” which was hash or porridge or stew – things you could eat with a spoon as they had no forks. Bread was rare, unless it was rye or corn bread, but they did have a lot of corn and pumpkin and root vegetables.

Honey and maple syrup were sweeteners when needed, and wild berries were always a treat, along with homemade applesauce. Dried apples as well as dried pumpkin were staples.

Indian corn was quickly learned to be easy to grow and cook, as well as filling and nutritional. It was served in countless ways and the husks and cobs were used for toy making as well as fire starters.

I talked about how cooperative the people were, whether they lived in a village or on outlying farms. There were quilting bees and barn raisings, as we’ve heard, but also stone bees (clearing fields) and husking bees (corn), paring bees (apples) and “whangs” which were cooperative spring cleaning bees (I think we should bring these cleaning bees back)! Of course, this is only a small sampling of ways that early folks used to work together to accomplish small and large tasks.

On Sundays, a horn, whistle or drum was often used to call people to “meeting” before meetinghouses had bells. There was a break in the day, held often at a “noon house,” a specific building for the lunch hour, that evolved into what we now might call a parish house or church society building.

Early meeting houses were not white as we see now, but just wooden buildings. Since they were the local meeting area, notices of all types were nailed to the outside walls and in the times when there was a bounty paid for wolves, wolf heads were also nailed to the outside wall as proof that someone had earned their bounty price.

Some other interesting things I discussed were goose baskets, pine knots, nocake, bean & corn counters, clam spoons, Indian brooms, heel pegs, rippling and more!

Don’t know what these are? Give me a follow and maybe I’ll talk about them soon!

Wishing you and yours a Happy Thanksgiving!

22
Nov
19

A New Type of Tour!

This summer we added a new type of tour to our list of historical offerings – a tasting tour!

Brushetta snacks for wine. Variety of small sandwiches on dark

Our Historic Tidbit Tasting Tours are following the trend of the “foodie” tours popping up all over the country, but we wanted to be based in history, as all of our tours are, but also to focus on Maine.

What we’ve come up with are really engaging, interesting tours that allow a guest to taste some real Maine foods and to learn tidbits of history about them in a fun way. If you love food and you love historical trivia, these tours are for you!

Since the tours take place in historic villages, some with original buildings, we thought we’d also offer just a tidbit of history about the restaurant or shop buildings that you’ll be in during the tour. In some lucky cases we also have photos of the old storefronts or can show you parts of the original woodwork or other unique items!

So, who knew that Maine blueberries used to be thought to have magical powers? Who knew that Maine potatoes are put to several unique uses other than just mashed or baked? Who knew that lobsters used to be avoided, or if necessary, eaten only by the poor or prisoners? Who knew that Moxie was not created as a soft drink?

There are many more fun tidbits that we share on these 2 hour tasting tours. Even though we say “tastes”, you should probably skip lunch if you’re joining us! You’ll have a chance to check off many of the food items in the “Maine Must Haves” booklet that you’ll receive at the beginning of your tour.

These tours are not just for visitors, local people also love the Tidbit Tastings just as much as someone who’s never been to Maine before! We are open through mid-December, and then will re-open again in the Spring – see you soon!

Red Cloak Historic Tidbit Tasting Tour in Bath Maine W




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