Archive for November, 2019

26
Nov
19

Colonial Life in New England

Today I had the best time doing a presentation on Colonial Life. This is something I’ve been fascinated with/by/about as long as I can remember!

I was able to take a few family heirlooms that I have to use as examples.

20191125_195130

Since it’s almost Thanksgiving, this was a fun topic to explore and think about as the Pilgrims landed 399 years ago!

We talked about cranes in fireplaces, baking ovens using cabbage leaves, spider pots and porringers, among other cooking items.

The Colonial table was very different than you might imagine. First of all, it was called a board, as it was a board just set on trestles or sawhorses. The covering was a boardcloth rather than tablecloth! There were no chairs, just benches or stools and we learned that children rarely sat – they stood at the table or even behind their parents, waiting to be handed food.

Most meat was cooked into “spoon meat” which was hash or porridge or stew – things you could eat with a spoon as they had no forks. Bread was rare, unless it was rye or corn bread, but they did have a lot of corn and pumpkin and root vegetables.

Honey and maple syrup were sweeteners when needed, and wild berries were always a treat, along with homemade applesauce. Dried apples as well as dried pumpkin were staples.

Indian corn was quickly learned to be easy to grow and cook, as well as filling and nutritional. It was served in countless ways and the husks and cobs were used for toy making as well as fire starters.

I talked about how cooperative the people were, whether they lived in a village or on outlying farms. There were quilting bees and barn raisings, as we’ve heard, but also stone bees (clearing fields) and husking bees (corn), paring bees (apples) and “whangs” which were cooperative spring cleaning bees (I think we should bring these cleaning bees back)! Of course, this is only a small sampling of ways that early folks used to work together to accomplish small and large tasks.

On Sundays, a horn, whistle or drum was often used to call people to “meeting” before meetinghouses had bells. There was a break in the day, held often at a “noon house,” a specific building for the lunch hour, that evolved into what we now might call a parish house or church society building.

Early meeting houses were not white as we see now, but just wooden buildings. Since they were the local meeting area, notices of all types were nailed to the outside walls and in the times when there was a bounty paid for wolves, wolf heads were also nailed to the outside wall as proof that someone had earned their bounty price.

Some other interesting things I discussed were goose baskets, pine knots, nocake, bean & corn counters, clam spoons, Indian brooms, heel pegs, rippling and more!

Don’t know what these are? Give me a follow and maybe I’ll talk about them soon!

Wishing you and yours a Happy Thanksgiving!

22
Nov
19

A New Type of Tour!

This summer we added a new type of tour to our list of historical offerings – a tasting tour!

Brushetta snacks for wine. Variety of small sandwiches on dark

Our Historic Tidbit Tasting Tours are following the trend of the “foodie” tours popping up all over the country, but we wanted to be based in history, as all of our tours are, but also to focus on Maine.

What we’ve come up with are really engaging, interesting tours that allow a guest to taste some real Maine foods and to learn tidbits of history about them in a fun way. If you love food and you love historical trivia, these tours are for you!

Since the tours take place in historic villages, some with original buildings, we thought we’d also offer just a tidbit of history about the restaurant or shop buildings that you’ll be in during the tour. In some lucky cases we also have photos of the old storefronts or can show you parts of the original woodwork or other unique items!

So, who knew that Maine blueberries used to be thought to have magical powers? Who knew that Maine potatoes are put to several unique uses other than just mashed or baked? Who knew that lobsters used to be avoided, or if necessary, eaten only by the poor or prisoners? Who knew that Moxie was not created as a soft drink?

There are many more fun tidbits that we share on these 2 hour tasting tours. Even though we say “tastes”, you should probably skip lunch if you’re joining us! You’ll have a chance to check off many of the food items in the “Maine Must Haves” booklet that you’ll receive at the beginning of your tour.

These tours are not just for visitors, local people also love the Tidbit Tastings just as much as someone who’s never been to Maine before! We are open through mid-December, and then will re-open again in the Spring – see you soon!

Red Cloak Historic Tidbit Tasting Tour in Bath Maine W

14
Nov
19

National Pickle Day

google eyes

Well, who knew, but I guess there’s a National Day for almost everything! I do love dill pickles, but I’m writing today because of a historical connection.

Half of my heritage is German, on my mother’s side, and I grew up in a German settled community in Nevada, now living in a German settled community in Maine.

Apparently there is a German custom of hanging a pickle ornament on your Christmas tree – the very last ornament to go on. This glass pickle ornament is supposed to be hung deep within the branches of the tree and a contest ensues as to who will be the first to spot it.

The first adult to spot it is guaranteed good luck for the following year, while the first child to spot it on Christmas morning gets an extra gift, something special from St. Nick.

I did not hear of this tradition until fairly recently and was a little puzzled that I hadn’t, given my background as well as having traveled in Germany several times in my life and knowing several German exchange students during my high school years.

In my house the star on top of the tree was always the last to go on! We didn’t have any tradition even close to the pickle and none of the German neighbors, church members, etc. practiced it.

Well, come to find out, no one in Germany does it either! Here is a link to an article that sums it all up pretty well – https://www.german-way.com/history-and-culture/holidays-and-celebrations/christmas/the-christmas-pickle-ornament/.

The idea is fun, though and could be something you start as one of your family traditions – hiding an ornament of some type in the tree and having a prize for the finder! I think I’ll put a pair of spooky google eyes in the tree, or maybe a skeleton, and use it similar to the “Elf on the Shelf” – you’d better be good because someone’s always watching!

Have a great day and enjoy gearing up for the holidays, whatever your customs and traditions!Pickle




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