Posts Tagged ‘blue moon

12
Oct
20

Once in a Blue Moon

This is the first time in about 19 years that we’ve had a full moon on Halloween, and it’s the first time since 1944 that a full moon will be seen in all time zones around the world on October 31st – extra creeepy!

We also have a rare “blue moon” on Halloween this year. According to NASA, “once in a blue moon” means something so rare that you might or might not see it in your lifetime. The next blue moon on Halloween will occur in 2039. This one is so called because it is the second full moon within a month – the first was on October 1st.

This Halloween full moon is also called a Hunters moon, a Travel moon or a Dying moon. The moon names that we might be familiar with – Harvest moon, Strawberry moon, Sturgeon moon were all named by Native Americans who used the moons to track the seasons and times for certain things such as hunting or strawberry picking.

A Hunters moon is self explanatory, while a Dying moon might also be – the time for the dying back of the crops after harvest. The Travel moon indicates the time of travel for the Native Americans who moved from place to place according to the seasons.

There are 2 different schools of thought on what a blue moon is – the second full moon in a month or the 4th full moon in a season. According to a 19th century Maine almanac, two full moons in a calendar month named the second as a “blue moon.” This was not commonly known until a radio game show in the 1970’s asked the question, with the answer of “a blue moon.”

The game of Trivial Pursuit, “Kids World Almanc of Records and Facts” (pub. 1985) and an article in a 1946 “Sky and Telescope” Magazine have all contributed to the term “Blue Moon.”

Blue moons are not really blue, unless there is smoke or a lot of dust particles in the air, such as during a volcanic eruption. During those times, the moon might take on a bluish hue.

The moon has always played an important part in the culture and lives of humankind. The moon’s phases helped people mark the passing of the seasons, as previously mentioned, but it also helped them plan for the future. Because the 13th moon was an oddity, there were many superstitions associated with it.

This rarity in the heavens became the basis for myths and legends, as well as superstitions all around the world. Some cultures considered the blue moon to be a trickster moon – a faker. Other cultures felt it was something to celebrate; something to aid in planning – to help predict the future.

I remember growing up with a full moon legend or two – one was about warts. I was told to take an old dishrag and bury it on the night of a full moon to get rid of warts. For a blue moon, you should blow on the wart 9 times during the blue moon to get rid of the wart!

Here are a few other superstitions surrounding the blue moon –

*pick flowers and berries during the blue moon to bring abundance and love into your life –

*looking at a blue moon, or having it shine on your face will bring bad luck; blinds should be closed during this time –

*if a family member dies during a blue moon, 3 more family members will follow –

*gangsters believed attempting a robbery on the 3rd day of a full moon will fail –

*a woman will be more fertile during a blue moon –

Enjoy this special time of all Hallow’s Eve, a Blue Moon, and a full moon. 2020 could not ask for anything more!

30
Aug
12

Once in a Blue Moon!

Tomorrow is a full moon night; always special, but this time it’s extra special as it’s the second full moon during the month of August! 2 full moons in one month does not happen often, the last one was in March 2010.

A blue moon has nothing to do with the color of the moon, just the old folklore expression for something that doesn’t happen very often.

Of course, many people believe it’s good luck to be born on a blue moon, or even in the month of a blue moon, so lucky birthdays to those!

The next blue moon will be in July 2015, so take advantage of this one, especially being on a Friday night, and enjoy – it’s a great night for a Haunted History Tour!




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