Posts Tagged ‘Christmas

08
Dec
17

Mistletoe Bride

“The Mistletoe Bough” written by Thomas Bayley (Bayly) in the early 1800’s and set to music in 1830, might have been inspired by an incident in Germany, reported in 1809.

Also known as “Mistletoe Bough, ” “The Missing Bride,” “The Lost Bride,” and sadly “Bride-and-Seek.”

The tale goes… a group of young friends on the night of the wedding were playing hide-n-seek and all were found but the bride. Everyone, including servants were employed to search the home and grounds. Thinking maybe she had been taken or had second thoughts, searchers were sent out through the countryside, looking in vain through the night. She was finally found 30 years later when the estate was being repaired and an old trunk in the attic popped open upon removal, finding the aged skeleton, and remnants of her wedding dress… I’m sure she haunts that castle!

The mistletoe hung in the castle hall,

The holly branch shone on the old oak wall’

And the baron’s retainers were blithe and gay,

And keeping their Christmas holiday.

The baron beheld with a father’s pride

His beautiful child, young Lovell’s bride;

While she with her bright eyes seemed to be

The star of the goodly company.

“I’m weary of dancing now,” she cried;

“Here, tarry a moment-I’ll hide, I’ll hide!”

And, Lovell, be sure thou’rt first to trace

The clew to my secret lurking place.”

Away she ran-and her friends began

Each tower to search, and each nook to scan;

And young Lovell cried, “O, wher dost thou hide?

I’m lonesome without thee, my own dear bride.”

 

They sought her that night, and they sought her next day;

And they sought her in vain while a week passed away;

In the highest, the lowest, the lonliest spot,

Young Lovell sought wildly-but found her not.

And years flew by, and their grief at last

Was told as a sorrowful tale long past;

And when Lovell appeared the children cried,

“See! the old man weeps for his fairy bride.”

 

At length an oak chest, that had long lain hid,

Was found in the castle-they raised the lid,

And a skeleton form lay moldering there

In the bridal wreath of that lady fair!

O, sad was her fate! – in sportive jest

She hid from her lord in the old oak chest.

It closed with a spring! – and, dreadful doom,

The bride lay clasped in her living tomb!

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22
Dec
13

“It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year”

There’ll be scary ghost stories and tales of the glories of Christmases long, long ago…

We’ve all hummed along or sung along with this classic Christmas Carol, dating to 1963, but most of us never really think about what ghost stories are doing in a Christmas Carol!

In reality, during Victorian times, telling ghost stories around the fire after Christmas Eve dinner was quite the norm. Just as normal as us nowadays hanging our stockings and putting out milk and cookies for Santa.

There are a lot of interesting evolutions of Christmas traditions, but this one certainly seems out of place. Apparantly, there is a connection to the Winter Solstice, as there is with many of our traditions; Yule Log, evergreens and gift giving to name a few.

Of course, “A Christmas Carol”, by Charles Dickens, involves the visitations of the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future, on Christmas Eve. A great story for re-telling!

I, for one, think this is a tradition that should be brought back to the forefront! Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

A great blog with lots of information on this topic can be found here http://www.hypnogoria.com/html/ghoststoriesforchristmas.html